The Blindness of Unbelief

“They did not know He was speaking to them about the Father. So Jesus said to them, “When you lift up the Son of Man, then you will know that I am He, and that I do nothing on My own. But just as the Father taught Me, I say these things.”
(John 8:27–28 HCSB)

John points out that the problem with those who were listening to Jesus (not to mention opposing him) was that They did not know He was speaking to them about the Father [God].  This they should have known because he was not reticent in proclaiming it again and again, as John himself pointed out earlier:

“This was why the Jews were seeking all the more to kill him, because not only was he breaking the Sabbath, but he was even calling God his own Father, making himself equal with God.” (John 5:18, ESV)

Don Carson tersely points out:  “One might have thought that the point had been made pretty clear in [John] 5:16–30.”

This is the peril of unbelief—it’s blindness.  Everything hinges on belief in Jesus as he himself just took pains to point out: “I told you that you would die in your sins, for unless you believe that I am he you will die in your sins.”” (John 8:24, ESV)

Alford expands: “There is no accounting for the ignorance of unbelief, as any minister of Christ knows by painful experience.”

The result?  Alford quotes Bengel: “Ye shall know by fact, that which ye now believe not by word.”

Ouch.

We would be remiss, dear reader, if we did not point out that these same claims come to you as an individual.  Jesus says to you: “Unless you believe that I am he you will die in your sins.”  Everything, and I do mean everything hinges upon Jesus.  If you do not believe his words and his actions, if you choose to remain in unbelief, that is your right, but of course you do not finish with Jesus at that point because you too “shall know by fact, that which ye now believe not by word.”

These are high stakes indeed.

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